Women in STEM

Leading the Lab

When Kim Budil, Ph.D. ’94, first joined the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory as a graduate student in 1987, she never anticipated that she would become its first female director 34 years later. She began her new role on March 2.

Daniela Barajas Ivey: A chemical engineer in aerospace

The best piece of advice M.S. student Daniela Barajas Ivey received as she earned her B.S. in chemical engineering at UC Davis was, “chemical engineering can be found in all disciplines.” She took this to heart and after joining the aerospace industry, she returned to UC Davis as a master’s student to study environmental control and life support systems (ECLSS) for human habitats in deep space.

Student Spotlight: Kyla Leacox

As a Division I swimmer and a fourth-year biochemical engineering major, Kyla Leacox is a master of balance. She has made the most of her time at UC Davis as a standout swimmer and an undergraduate researcher and tutor in the chemical engineering department.

Karen McDonald elected AIChE Fellow

Chemical engineering professor Karen McDonald was elected fellow of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE), the organization’s highest grade of membership. AIChE fellowship recognizes members who have significant professional accomplishments, contributions and service in chemical engineering and is only achieved through election by fellow members.

Jennifer Sinclair Curtis receives Alexander von Humboldt Research Award

Chemical engineering (CHE) distinguished professor Jennifer Sinclair Curtis has received the prestigious Alexander von Humboldt Foundation Research Award. Every year, the award recognizes world-renowned researchers from all disciplines whose fundamental discoveries, theories and findings have had a lasting effect on their field and brings them to German institutions as visiting scholars.

Karen McDonald receives TRISH grant to study just-in-time medications for space exploration

Chemical engineering professor Karen McDonald and her team have received funding to develop plant-based methods for producing FDA-approved drugs in under 24 hours for use in deep space. The proposal, “A Plant-Based Platform for ‘Just in Time’ Medications” is one of six to receive of a two year, $800,000 Translational Research Institute for Space Health (TRISH) grant from the Baylor College of Medicine.

Talking loudly may be a factor in airborne disease transmission

A new study from UC Davis found that the louder people talk, the more airborne particles they emit, making loudness a potential factor in spreading airborne diseases. The study, led by chemical engineering Ph.D. student Sima Asadi in professor William Ristenpart’s group, looked at particle emission during speech as a function of loudness, among other factors.